Kimberley church floor plaque

I was working in Kimberley church in Norfolk this week, adding some lettering to a large marble plaque, and was very taken by this wonderful 17th century floor plaque……

Kimberley floor plaque

HEARE LIETH ANN THE WIFE OF EDMVND WODEHOUSE OF EAST LEXHAM ESQ THE ONELY CHILD OF JOHN ANGVISH OF GRAT MELTON ESQ AN OBEDIENET DAVGHTER TENDERLY LOVING WIFE & MOTHER AND A DISRETT MISTRESE DYED THE 28 OF JULY ANNO DIMMIN 1685

There are several interesting elements to this – firstly the spelling stands out. Clearly, language has evolved in the last 333 years, but there may have been some ‘freedom’ or lack of clarity as to the correct spelling even then. I have seen some of these variants before (such as HEARE, ONELY) but GRAT (for Great) and OBEDIENET seem quite Chaucerian. I particularly like ANNO DIMMIN (for Domini) and DISRETT MISTRESE ~ is that a discreet mistress? I think it may be ‘District mistress’ some sort of role in society, but I can’t get any further than that by searching online. I welcome any comments on this.

As for the lettering style, I think it’s gorgeous. It is linear and mono-weight (no variation in weight such as you would see in brush-derived letterforms like Roman or calligraphic lettering). I particularly like the H in HEARE, the lush W’s, the X, the C in CHILD, the D in DYED, T in TENDERLY, the J in JULY, the 5 and those lovely little triangles above the (upper case!) I’s. Also the ligatures (where letters are joined as in the first THE) are delightful and the A’s are interesting – where they start the word they are embellished with a flourish, but within a word they’re simple.

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Posted in 17th Century carved lettering, church carving, design and spacing, found lettering, lettercutting, old memorials, stone carving | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Here be hares

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London Design Fair

I finished setting up my stand today, and had a bit of a wander about. There’s an exciting array of designs by some of the country’s top craftspeople. Furniture, pottery, wallpaper, textiles, lighting, and all sorts of innovative products. Here is a snapshot…. pictures taken during the set up. Come and see me there. At the bottom of this post you will find a private view invitation and complimentary pass. You can download, complete and print these for free entry. I hope to see you there.

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Experimental head

I made this yesterday, it’s some kind of imported sandstone. I’m not sure how much I like it…. I had an ancient mesoamerican carving in my mind, but this is not as nice. What do you think? I know it’s derivative, but it’s also a bit timeless and spontaneous….

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Find me @ London Design Fair

London design fair coming up, it’d be nice to see you there
http://www.londondesignfair.couk/visit

LDFcollage

Posted in Applied Lettering, architectural lettering, architecture, church carving, design and spacing, digital lettering design, exhibition pieces, font design, laser-cut lettering, lettercutting, London Design Fair, stone carving, stone sculpture, typography | Tagged | Leave a comment

An odd pair

I made a couple of bowls over the weekend. One is Carrara Bianco marble, the other is a really nice piece of Welsh slate. These were both inspired by an exhibition at the SCVA (Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts) called FIJI, Art and Life in the Pacific. Among this incredible collection of artefacts (the largest collection ever shown) were some lovely bowls.

My bowls are more chunky, especially the legs on the Welsh slate one. As slate is a laminated material, I couldn’t make them thinner without risking them snapping off. This one showed amazing colour when rubbed. Here’s a few pictures…..

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Hidden treasures 

We’re on a road trip, transporting work from Dorset to Cambridge. This gave us a chance to take up an offer of accommodation with a fellow stone enthusiast, Martin Green, archaeologist and farmer.

He lives near Sixpenny Handley, in Cranborne Chase. He said “if you are passing pop in and say hello, you could see my collection of bits and pieces”. Well he wasn’t joking. He had an amazing collection of archaeological finds, fossils, stones and tools. He also lives on a farm with a lot of important sites on it. We had the guided tour. There’s a lot of information here if you are interested. He has given permission to Southampton University to undertake digs on his farm. It was a fascinating overnight stay with a lovely man. His book all about FLINT (and his ongoing love affair with all things flinty) will be coming out soonish, and will be really interesting. Here’s a few pictures….. starting with one of a pond barrow he uncovered on the farm.

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