Recent work in Aldborough

We installed a stone in Aldborough the other day, and it was a chance to see some of my previous commissions there, some of which are shown below. They vary considerably in style, design and materials. I have used all my own fonts on these, hand drawn and hand carved. I hope you like them, the older stones are starting to weather nicely now.

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Moleanos limestone from Portugal

The stone above was a memorial to a friend who ran Aldborough antique shop. The stone has references to some of his furniture and the bell that was attached to his door and rang upon entry. I miss Terry, he was a real character. He was always giving things to my kids…..

Here are a few more

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Crossland Hill York stone

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Crossland Hill York stone

Above is a York stone memorial showing the front and back of the stone. Marianne was a Moari, and the symbolism on the stone reflects her ancestry. The raised carving of the Koru on the front was copied from a bone pendant she wore and the fern carving on the back symbolises new life, growth, strength and peace.

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Woodkirk stone, from Yorkshire
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Woodkirk stone, from Yorkshire

This stone above was to a local woman of German descent, and the design and lettering was created to give a Germanic feel to the stone. I designed and drew these letters specifically for this commission. It’s weathering beautifully.

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Woodkirk stone, from Yorkshire
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Woodkirk stone, from Yorkshire
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detail from the Cook memorial above
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detail from the Denham memorial above

Above are two more York stone memorials, one featuring a lily carving and another an Ethiopian cross.

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Welsh slate monolithic piece

This wonderful piece of stone was one I came across in a quarry in Wales. I knew Alan, he was a lovely lad, a keen fisherman. The stripes made me think of water.

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Above, another piece of York stone, carved on both sides as you can see. Words by Mother Julian of Norwich adorn the back with an early Christian inspired depiction of incised doves on the back, complimenting the relief carvings on the front.

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Honed Welsh slate
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Honed welsh slate

 

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detail from Penny’s stone
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detail from Penny’s stone

This one is Welsh slate. Penny was my friend and neighbour and was very into her flowers. She was a lovely woman, missed by many. Working with slate gives a very different effect, it’s more akin to illustration than sculpture. The sharpness of the lettering and level of detail that can be achieved in slate is very challenging and rewarding.

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Nabresina limestone from Croatia/Italy border

This last image shows a cross made using Nabresina limestone. I quite like the simplicity of this, and the subtle bluey colour of the paint.

An odd pair

I made a couple of bowls over the weekend. One is Carrara Bianco marble, the other is a really nice piece of Welsh slate. These were both inspired by an exhibition at the SCVA (Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts) called FIJI, Art and Life in the Pacific. Among this incredible collection of artefacts (the largest collection ever shown) were some lovely bowls.

My bowls are more chunky, especially the legs on the Welsh slate one. As slate is a laminated material, I couldn’t make them thinner without risking them snapping off. This one showed amazing colour when rubbed. Here’s a few pictures…..

Moleanos limestone and glass

we drove to Cumbria yesterday to install a stone in Carlisle cemetery. It was an experimental piece with raised carvings showing that Daniel (PODGE) was very into his bicycles, and also incorporating a glass element, which really brings the stone to life. The glass was made to order as a one-off by Joseph Harrington,  glass sculptor.

see these pictures:

Moleanos limestone memorial

I have been working on this stone, and the glass insert is now in place. I like the way the light brings the memorial to life. ‘Podge’ was really into bicycles, so I incorporated the cogs to show this.

Kilkenny limestone in situ

Back in December I wrote a blog about this sculpture made using kilkenny limestone. Well I now have pictures of it in situ thanks to my client. I made a similar sculpture over 10 years ago which was in the same material (see bottom image), but quite different in that it is well grounded and bottom heavy. This is obviously more top heavy. I wanted to push this idea and make something that looked poised, or as if it were balancing. Then we had the idea of having it installed in a sleeve so it can be rotated. The client is an engineer/builder so he did a lot of the work on this, and installed the stone himslef using block and tackle and scaffolding. He tells me it can be turned using one finger! I love the idea of it being both solid and movable. It is a very tactile piece with polished areas and rough clawed surfaces. It is also fun for the kids!

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Relief carving

I am currently busy working on three carved panels for St Michael and All Angels churchyard in Dalton, Skelmersdale. I have designed a wall and these panels will be built into it. The central panel is St Michael struggling with a dragon and it will be flanked by two angel panels. These pictures show work in progress.ImageImageImage